Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less ※ i like reading ∕ Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less because ⁚ Kindle Ebook Author Greg McKeown ₎ Chapter 1The EssentialistThe wisdom of life consists in the elimination of non essentials Lin YutangSam Elliot1 is a capable executive in Silicon Valley who found himself stretched too thin after his company was acquired by a larger, bureaucratic business.1Name has been changed.He was in earnest about being a good citizen in his new role so he said yes to many requests without really thinking about it But as a result he would spend the whole day rushing from one meeting and conference call to another trying to please everyone and get it all done His stress went up as the quality of his work went down It was like he was majoring in minor activities and as a result, his work became unsatisfying for him and frustrating for the people he was trying so hard to please.In the midst of his frustration the company came to him and offered him an early retirement package But he was in his early 50s and had no interest in completely retiring He thought briefly about starting a consulting company doing what he was already doing He even thought of selling his services back to his employer as a consultant But none of these options seemed that appealing So he went to speak with a mentor who gave him surprising advice Stay, but do what you would as a consultant and nothing else And dont tell anyone In other words, his mentor was advising him to do only those things that he deemed essential and ignore everything else that was asked of him.The executive followed the advice He made a daily commitment towards cutting out the red tape He began saying no.He was tentative at first He would evaluate requests based on the timid criteria, Can I actually fulfill this request, given the time and resources I have If the answer was no then he would refuse the request He was pleasantly surprised to find that while people would at first look a little disappointed, they seemed to respect his honesty.Encouraged by his small wins he pushed back a bit Now when a request would come in he would pause and evaluate the request against a tougher criteria Is this the very most important thing I should be doing with my time and resources right now If he couldnt answer a definitive yes, then he would refuse the request And once again to his delight, while his colleagues might initially seem disappointed, they soon began respecting him for his refusal, not less.Emboldened, he began to apply this selective criteria to everything, not just direct requests In his past life he would always volunteer for presentations or assignments that came up last minute now he found a way to not sign up for them He used to be one of the first to jump in on an email trail, but now he just stepped back and let others jump in He stopped attending conference calls that he only had a couple of minutes of interest in He stopped sitting in on the weekly update call because he didnt need the information He stopped attending meetings on his calendar if he didnt have a direct contribution to make He explained to me, Just because I was invited didnt seem a good enough reason to attend.It felt self indulgent at first But by being selective he bought himself space, and in that space he found creative freedom He could concentrate his efforts one project at a time He could plan thoroughly He could anticipate roadblocks and start to remove obstacles Instead of spinning his wheels trying to get everything done, he could get the right things done His newfound commitment to doing only the things that were truly important and eliminating everything else restored the quality of his work Instead of making just a millimeter of progress in a million directions he began to generate tremendous momentum towards accomplishing the things that were truly vital.He continued this for several months He immediately found that he not only got of his day back at work, in the evenings he got even time back at home He said, I got back my family life I can go home at a decent time Now instead of being a slave to his phone he shuts it down He goes to the gym He goes out to eat with his wife.To his great surprise, there were no negative repercussions to his experiment His manager didnt chastise him His colleagues didnt resent him Quite the opposite because he was left only with projects that were meaningful to him and actually valuable to the company, they began to respect and value his work than ever His work became fulfilling again His performance ratings went up He ended up with one of the largest bonuses of his career In this example is the basic value proposition of Essentialism only once you give yourself permission to stop trying to do it all, to stop saying yes to everyone, can make your highest contribution towards the things that really matter.What about you How many times have you reacted to a request by saying yes without really thinking about it How many times have you resented committing to do something and wondered, Why did I sign up for this How often do you say yes simply to please Or to avoid trouble Or because yes had just become your default response Now let me ask you this Have you ever found yourself stretched too thin Have you ever felt both overworked and underutilized Have you ever found yourself majoring in minor activities Do you ever feel busy but not productive Like youre always in motion, but never getting anywhere If you answered yes to any of these, the way out is the way of the Essentialist.The Way of the EssentialistDieter Rams was the lead designer at Braun for many years He is driven by the idea that almost everything is noise He believes very few things are essential His job is to filter through that noise until he gets to the essence For example, as a young twenty four year old at the company he was asked to collaborate on a record player The norm at the time was to cover the turntable in a solid wooden lid or even to incorporate the player into a piece of living room furniture Instead, he and his team removed the clutter and designed a player with a clear plastic cover on the top and nothing It was the first time such a design had been used, and it was so revolutionary people worried it might bankrupt the company because nobody would buy it It took courage, as it always does, to eliminate the nonessential By the sixties this aesthetic started to gain traction In time it became the design every other record player followed.Dieters design criteria can be summarized by a characteristically succinct principle, captured in just three German words Weniger aber besser The English translation is Less but better A fitting definition of Essentialism would be hard to come by.The way of the Essentialist is the relentless pursuit of less but better It doesnt mean occasionally giving a nod to the principle It means pursuing it in a disciplined way.The way of the Essentialist isnt about setting New Years resolutions to say no , or about pruning your in box, or about mastering some new strategy in time management It is about pausing constantly to ask, Am I investing in the right activities There are far activities and opportunities in in the world than we have time and resources to invest in And although many of them may be good, or even very good, the fact is that most are trivial and few are vital The way of the Essentialist involves learning to tell the difference learning to filter through all those options and selecting only those that are truly essential.Essentialism is not about how to get things done its about how to get the right things done It doesnt mean just doing less for the sake of less either It is about making the wisest possible investment of your time and energy in order to operate at our highest point of contribution by doing only what is essential.The difference between the way of the Essentialist and the way of the Nonessentialist can be seen in figure 1 above In both images the same amount of effort is exerted In the image on the left, the energy is divided into many different activities The result is that we have the unfulfilling experience of making a millimeter of progress in a million directions In the image on the right, the energy is given to fewer activities The result is that by investing in fewer things we have the satisfying experience of making significant progress in the things that matter most The way of the Essentialist rejects the idea that we can fit it all in Instead it requires us to grapple with real trade offs and make tough decisions In many cases we can learn to make one time decisions that make a thousand future decisions so we dont exhaust ourselves asking the same questions again and again.The way of the Essentialist means living by design, not by default Instead of making choices reactively, the Essentialist deliberately distinguishes the vital few from the trivial many, eliminates the nonessentials, and then removes obstacles so the essential things have clear, smooth passage In other words, Essentialism is a disciplined, systematic approach for determining where our highest point of contribution lies, then making execution of those things almost effortless.The way of the Essentialist is the path to being in control of our own choices It is a path to new levels of success and meaning It is the path on which we enjoy the journey, not just the destination Despite all these benefits, however, there are too many forces conspiring to keep us from applying the disciplined pursuit of less but better, which may be why so many end up on the misdirected path of the Nonessentialist.The Way of the NonessentialistOn a bright, winter day in California I visited my wife, Anna, in the hospital Even in the hospital Anna was radiant But I also knew she was exhausted It was the day after our precious daughter was born, healthy and happy at 7 pounds, 3 ounces.1Yet what should have been one of the happiest, most serene days of my life was actually filled with tension Even as my beautiful new baby lay in my wifes tired arms, I was on the phone and on email with work, and I was feeling pressure to go to a client meeting My colleague had written, Friday between 12 would be a bad time to have a baby because I need you to come be at this meeting with X It was now Friday and though I was pretty certain or at least I hoped the email had been written in jest, I still felt pressure to attend.Instinctively, I knew what to do It was clearly a time to be there for my wife and newborn child So when asked whether I planned to attend the meeting, I said with all the conviction I could muster Yes.To my shame, while my wife lay in the hospital with our hours old baby, I went to the meeting Afterward, my colleague said, The client will respect you for making the decision to be here But the look on the clients faces did not evince respect Instead, they mirrored how I felt What was I doing there I had said yes simply to please, and in doing so I had hurt my family, my integrity, and even the client relationship.As it turned out, exactly nothing came of the client meeting But even if it had, surely I would have made a fools bargain In trying to keep everyone happy I had sacrificed what mattered most.On reflection I discovered this important lesson If you dont prioritize your life, someone else will.That experience gave me renewed interest read, inexhaustible obsession in understanding why otherwise intelligent people make the choices they make in their personal and professional lives Why is it, I wonder, that we have so much ability inside of us than we often choose to utilize And How can we make the choices that allow us to tap into of the potential inside ourselves, and in people everywhere My mission to shed light on these questions had already led me to quit law school in England and travel, eventually, to California to do my graduate work at Stanford It had led me to spend than two years collaborating on a book, Multipliers How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter And it went on to inspire me to start a strategy and leadership company in Silicon Valley, where I now work with some of the most capable people in some of the most interesting companies in the world, helping to set them on the path of the Essentialist.In my work I have seen people all over the world who are consumed and overwhelmed by the pressures all around them I have coached successful people in the quiet pain of trying desperately to do everything, perfectly, now I have seen people trapped by controlling managers and unaware that they do not have to do all the thankless busywork they are asked to do And I have worked tirelessly to understand why so many bright, smart, capable individuals remain snared in the death grip of the nonessential.What I have found has surprised me.I worked with one particularly driven executive who got into technology at a young age and loved it He was quickly rewarded for his knowledge and passion with and opportunities Eager to build on his success, he continued to read as much as he could and pursue all he could with gusto and enthusiasm By the time I met him he was hyperactive, trying to learn it all and do it all He seemed to find a new obsession every day, sometimes every hour And in the process, he lost his ability to discern the vital few from the trivial many Everything was important As a result he was stretched thinner and thinner He was making a millimeter of progress in a million directions He was overworked and under utilized Thats when I sketched out for him the image on the left of figure 1.He stared at it for the longest time in uncharacteristic silence Then he said, with than a hint of emotion, That is the story of my life Then I sketched the image on the right What would happen if we could figure out the one thing you could do that would make the highest contribution I asked him He responded sincerely That is the question.1 A version of this story was published in a blog post I wrote for Harvard Business Review called If You Dont Prioritize Your Life, Someone Else Will, June 28, 2012,Do you feel it, too That relentless pressure to sample all the good things in life To do all the right things The reality is, you dont make progress that way Instead, youre in danger of spreading your efforts so thin that you make no impact at all Greg McKeown believes the answer lies in paring life down to its essentials He cant tell you whats essential to every life, but he can help you find the meaning in yours Daniel H Pink, author of TO SELL IS HUMAN and DRIVEEntrepreneurs succeed when they say yes to the right project, at the right time, in the right way To accomplish this, they have to be good at saying no to all their other ideas Essentialism offers concise and eloquent advice on how to determine what you care about most,and how to apply your energies in ways that ultimately bring you the greatest rewards Reid Hoffman, co founder chairman of LinkedIn and co author of the 1 NYT bestseller The Start up of YouGreg McKeowns excellent new book is a much needed antidote to the stress, burnout and compulsion to do everything, that infects us all It is an Essential read for anyone who wants to regain control of their health, well being, and happiness Arianna Huffington, Co founder, president, and editor in chief, Huffington Post Media Group Essentialismholds the keys to solving one of the great puzzles of life how can we do less but accomplish A timely, essential read for anyone who feels overcommitted, overloaded, or overworkedin other words, everyone It has already changed the way that I think about my own priorities, and if leaders embraced this philosophy, our jobs and our lives would be less stressful and productive So drop what youre doing and read it. Adam Grant, Wharton professor and bestselling author of Give and TakeAs a self proclaimed maximalist who always wants to do it all, this book challenged me and improved my life If you want to work better, not just less, you should read it too Chris Guillebeau, NYT bestselling author of The 100 StartupGreat design takes us beyond the complex, the unnecessary and confusing, to the simple, clear and meaningful This is as true for the design of a life as it is for the design of a product With Essentialism, Greg McKeown gives us the invaluable guidebook for just such a project Tim Brown, CEO of IDEOIn Essentialism, Greg McKeown makes a compelling case for achieving by doing less He reminds us that clarity of focus and the ability to say no are both critical and undervalued in business today Jeff Weiner, CEO, LinkedInWhile everyone else is still leafing through Lean Inor Outliers, get a competitive jump on the new year with.Essentialism learn how to identify the right things, focus on getting them done, and forget the rest In other words, do less, but better ForbesEssentialism is a powerful antidote to the current craziness that plagues our organizations and our lives Read Greg McKeowns words slowly, stop and think about how to apply them to your life you will do less, do it better, and begin to feel the insanity start to slip away Robert I Sutton, Professor at Stanford University and author of Good Boss, Bad Boss and Scaling Up Excellence In a world of increasing chaos and complexity, the ideas and tools of Essentialism turn chaos into commitment and complexity into accomplishment This timely, well written book is a must read and do for any employee, manager, leader, or parent whoever feels overwhelmed It is truly the right book at the right time Dave Ulrich, Professor, University of Michigan School of Business and Partner, the RBL GroupEssentialism is a rare gem that will change lives Greg offers deep insights, rich context and actionable steps to living life at its fullest I ve started on the path to an Essentialist way of life, and the impact on my productivity and well being is profound Bill Rielly,Senior Vice President, Intel SecurityIn this likeable and astute treatise on the art of doing less in order to do betterMcKeown makes the content fresh and the solutions easy to implement Following his lucid and smart directions will help readers fine the way of the essentialist Success MagazineEssentialism will give you richer, sweeter results and put you in real control, giving greater precision to the pursuit of what truly matters Forbes.com From the Hardcover edition. Essentialism The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Essentialism isn t one thing it is a different way doing everything It discipline you apply constantly, effortlessly mindset life an idea whose time has come In Essentialism, Greg McKeown, CEO Leadership and Strategy agency in Silicon Valley who run courses at Apple, Google Facebook, shows how to achieve what he calls the disciplined pursuit less Being Essentialist about thinking means challenging core assumption We can have all I do replacing with Comment This item wear from use, but remains good condition works great may be marked, identifying markings on it, or show other signs previous use Less author McKeown s manifesto for better nutshell catch fraise book if not hell yes, no prime directive identify really matters b ditch CBNQ close quite stuff c bite down tear your mission apart like re cross between Gandhi pitbull Asperger syndrome ie big PDF Free download read online pdf ePUB first edition this novel was published January st , written by Greg Advocate THIS Inc company, teaches executives lead design default FREE shipping qualifying offers INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES AND WALL STREET draws experience insight working leaders most innovative companies world Disciplined Kindle Download once device, PC, phones tablets writes, teaches, speaks around importance living leading as He spoken including Denny Bloomin Garden Centre and Denny Landscape been providing high quality plants materials local communities Tri State area Podcast How Prioritize Life that Matters Website Beautiful Encouragement Help You Live Your Unique Mission With Lori Nunno April Perry Would learn easily Boston Bruins Draft History hockeydb Boston Entry NHL Totals Num Round Player Pos Drafted From GP G A Pts PIM Fantasy Basketball Rankings Monster Fantasy Projections since Kit Projected Ranks, Rookie Dynasty much Leadership Training Workshops Team Wiseman Group Training, Team Development Programs develop take toughest challenges Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

  • Format Kindle
  • 274 pages
  • Greg McKeown
  • Anglais
  • 09 December 2017